Journals

Second Journey (MS 107/1/1-2)

16th February 1778


transcription

[16th February 1778]
16

betrokken donderlugt stil, iets z:o: door den dag. vertrok eerst een half uur z: aan tot op de hoogte, daarna door een grote gras vlakte met grote bossen omgeven, twe uren west, tot aan een bos in een cloof de poort genaamd, hier by ontspringt de witte drift die by kretsinger voorby by keurbooms riviersmond in deselve loopt. ging over grote hoogtens en diepe cloven met vele draayen, en quam na omtrent drie uren meest z:w:, aan neisenas mond, op de plaats van stefanus terblanche. ging na neisenasmond aan strand dat oost en west strekte, hoog en krantsig, sodat maar op een kleine plaats aan strand kon komen. dese rivier, die uit het n:w: uit outeniquas gebergte met vele draayen komt, is hier zeer breed, en het ty gaat sterk tot anderhalf uur de rivier op en maakt het water sout. zy loopt door een poort een hondert passen breedt, en zeer steil in zee, het was laag water, en zag de rolling om de drie a vier minuten in de poort sterk breken schoon het seer stil weer en eenen westelyke wind was. zodat om hier in te komen voor een hoeker zelfs onmogelyk is. de franse Capitein die hier in wilde, en het ligt van een der twe huisen die hier omtrent liggen zeide gesien te hebben, moet een ander vuur gesien hebben, also geen der huisen by of omtrent in de gesigts linie staat. peilde en nam een gesigt van de neisena. in het weerom keeren, lag een tamelyke grote gele slang op een

[page 44]
bos, terblanch die agter my reed, riep omdat omtrent met myn hand by hem was, daar hy lag te loeren, seer verschrikt een slang, waarop stil houdende vroeg waar, hy my wysende, zag de slang onbeweeglyk na my leggen loeren. wat op zy rydende, schoot hem doodt. dese slangen leggen dus na vogels te loeren, en zyn gevaarlyk als men hen op het lyf komt.

desen agtermiddag seer heet, donder in het noorden en weinig z w en z:o: wind. s'avonds sware weerligt sag twe oyevaars.

translation

[16th February 1778]
16

Overcast, thundery sky, calm. A light south-east wind throughout the day. Departed, going south for half an hour first, until we reached the top and thereafter westwards across a large grassy plain surrounded by large forests for two hours until we came to a forest in a kloof called the Poort. Near this is the source of the Wittedrift which flows past Kritzinger's and into the Keurbooms River at the mouth of the same. I went over large hills and deep kloofs with many turns and after about three hours going mostly south west, I reached the Knysna’s mouth on the farm of Stefanus Terblanche. Went to the Knysna’s mouth at the shore, which stretches east and west. It is high, with cliffs so that one can only reach the shore at one narrow place. This river, which flows with many bends from the Outeniqua Mountains in the north-west, is very wide here, and the tide goes strongly up the river for an hour and a half’s distance and makes the water salty. It flows into the sea through a defile that is a hundred paces wide and very steep. It was low tide and I saw the swell breaking every three or four minutes in the defile, even though it was calm weather with a light westerly wind. It would be impossible for even a hooker to enter here. The French Captain who wanted to enter here and who said he had seen the light of one of the two houses situated around here, must have seen some other fire, since none of the houses at or around this place are in the line of vision. On my return I took bearings on and drew a view of the Knysna.
Turning around to go back there as s fairly large yellow snake lying on a bush.

[page 44]
Because I was almost touching it with my hand as it lay there on the lookout, Terblanche who was riding behind took great fright and called out 'a snake!'. At this I stopped and asked 'where?' and when he had shown me I saw the snake lying there motionless, watching me. Riding a little to one side, I shot it dead. These snakes lie in this manner watching out for birds and are dangerous if one steps on them.

Very hot this afternoon with thunder in the north and a light south-west and south-east wind. Much lightning in the evening. Saw two storks.